Low Vision

What is Low Vision?

Low vision is loss of vision that’s so severe, even regular glasses, contacts, medicine or surgery can’t correct it. People with low vision find everyday tasks difficult to impossible. Examples include reading, writing, driving or even recognizing faces.

Maintaining Independence

Thankfully, losing vision doesn’t mean losing a normal life. It does means finding new ways to do everyday activities, however. Rehabilitation is prescribed to help patients with low vision to make the most of what sight remains to maintain quality of life.

Causes

Causes of low vision range from macular degeneration to glaucoma to diabetic retinopathy to retinitis pigmentosa to eye injuries and more. These conditions can occur at any age but are more common in older people. It’s important to note that normal aging of the eye does not lead to low vision.

 

Regular medical eye exams are important for diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases and conditions that can be helped. Should low vision develop, having these regular eye exams means patients can start the process of low vision rehabilitation quicker.

Types

Common types of low vision include:

  • Loss of central vision
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Night blindness
  • Blurred vision
  • Hazy vision

 

  • Did you know?

    Phantom visions or Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    About one in four people with vision loss sees images they know aren’t real. This is known as Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) and it’s the brain’s way of replacing the absence of images produced by the damaged eye.

  • Estimated number of adult Americans

    who have trouble seeing (even with corrective eyewear), or who are unable to see at all.*

     

    *National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Provisional Report, 2008

     

  • Low Vision Eye Specialist Dr. John Cottle O.D.

    Ask Dr. Cottle

    Q:

    Is low vision a symptom of aging?

    A: No

    Low vision is not a normal symptom of aging. Our optometrists can tell the difference. If you’ve noticed changes in your vision, please make an appointment to see your eye doctor right away.

For emergency or time sensitive appointments, call 913-261-2020
or 1-800-742-0020 (toll free).

Schedule Appointment

Are you a new or returning patient?

Returning Patient

Have you enrolled in Patient Portal and do you have a password?


Returning Patient

As of the beginning of 2015, we are asking all returning patients to enroll in Patient Portal. This online portal contains a wealth of general health information, along with patient-specific communications from our practice.

To sign up, please call our scheduling department at 913-261-2020. They will provide you with a PIN number to use when enrolling.

New Patient Information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment

A Medical Eye Exam -

  • Thorough dilated exam to address eye medical conditions.
  • Examples: cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration.
  • This type of exam is a detailed medical exam to determine, assess, and recommend any treatment necessary and may include additional testing.
  • Filed to your insurance under medical coverage.

A Routine Eye Exam -

  • This type of exam will assess the basic general health of your eyes and may include dilation.
  • Schedule a new glasses or contact lens prescription.
  • Filed as a routine eye exam with your insurance or vision service plan.
  • No medical eye conditions will be evaluated at this exam.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Are you a contact lens wearer?


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Physician



The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Insurance Information

Please contact your insurance to confirm network eligibility.

Are you the primary insurance holder

Yes No

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Preferred Time of Appointment

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Additional information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Confirm Your information

Type of Appointment

Medical Routine



Are you the primary insurance holder

Yes No

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Thank You

You're ready to see the best.

You've successfully requested an appointment with Sabates Eye Centers, the most trusted name in eye care.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We'll be in touch by phone by 5 p.m. the next business day (Monday-Friday) to confirm your appointment.

Thank you for choosing Sabates Eye Centers.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Low vision can only be fully diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam by an ophthalmologist. We begin by asking questions about the vision problems you’re experiencing and any family history of eye disease. We also conduct a series of tests to evaluate your vision and detect any presence of injury or disease. The tests often involve a number of instruments, with a variety of different lenses and lights that help us determine the degree of low vision.

 

The exam gives us all a better idea of how to maximize your remaining vision. While there may be no way to return lost vision, many people with low vision learn new ways to conduct their everyday lives and enjoy their normal activities.