Pediatric Ophthalmology

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Developing Vision

Children can experience a number of eye problems that are quite different from those affecting adults. A pediatric ophthalmologist is specially trained for a child’s developing visual system and to manage various eye diseases in children. These range from infections like conjunctivitis to strabismus and other misalignments of the eyes, as well as blocked tear ducts, pediatric cataracts and glaucoma, and genetic disorders. 
 

Many pediatricians and ophthalmologists in the region refer children to Sabates Eye Centers for complex problems and surgeries. Our doctors are affiliated with several Kansas City hospitals, and Sabates Eye Centers serves as the ophthalmology department for Children’s Mercy Hospital. 

Pediatric Ophthalmology Doctors

The Sabates Eye Centers Approach to Pediatric Ophthalmology

Similar to how we treat adults, we have subspecialists who treat every area of a child’s eye. Newborn or teenager – we can handle it. Our pediatric ophthalmologists diagnose, treat and manage all children’s eye problems. This includes:

 

    • Conducting eye exams
    • Performing surgery, microsurgery and laser surgery
    • Administering chemotherapy
    • Diagnosing problems of the eye caused by diseases of the body
    • Diagnosing visual processing disorders
    • Caring for eye injuries
    • Prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses 

 

Please click here to learn more about - children's eye care.

  • Image of upside down tree depicting that it’s a myth that babies see the world upside down the first few months.

    DID YOU KNOW?

    While their vision isn’t totally developed, it’s a myth that babies see the world upside down the first few months. 

  • Carrots are a good source of Vitamin A which is good for vision health.

    WHAT'S UP, DOC?

    The old wives’ tale about eating carrots for good vision holds true. However, any source of Vitamin A (in moderation) is an essential nutrient. 

  • Pediatric ophthalmology eye surgery specialist Dr. David B. Lyon M.D., FACS - Sabates Eye Centers

    PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY SPECIALIST

    Dr. David B. Lyon M.D., FACS – Dr. Lyon sees patients at the Independence, Leawood, Northland, Plaza, Olathe and Warrensburg Eye Centers, plus at Truman Medical Center – University Health and Lakewood.

For emergency or time sensitive appointments, call 913-261-2020
or 1-800-742-0020 (toll free).

Schedule Appointment

Are you a new or returning patient?

Returning Patient

Have you enrolled in Patient Portal and do you have a password?


Returning Patient

As of the beginning of 2015, we are asking all returning patients to enroll in Patient Portal. This online portal contains a wealth of general health information, along with patient-specific communications from our practice.

To sign up, please call our scheduling department at 913-261-2020. They will provide you with a PIN number to use when enrolling.

New Patient Information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment

A Medical Eye Exam -

  • Thorough dilated exam to address eye medical conditions.
  • Examples: cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration.
  • This type of exam is a detailed medical exam to determine, assess, and recommend any treatment necessary and may include additional testing.
  • Filed to your insurance under medical coverage.

A Routine Eye Exam -

  • This type of exam will assess the basic general health of your eyes and may include dilation.
  • Schedule a new glasses or contact lens prescription.
  • Filed as a routine eye exam with your insurance or vision service plan.
  • No medical eye conditions will be evaluated at this exam.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Physician



The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

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Please contact your insurance to confirm network eligibility.

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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

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Additional information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

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Medical Routine



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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

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You've successfully requested an appointment with Sabates Eye Centers, the most trusted name in eye care.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We'll be in touch by phone by 5 p.m. the next business day (Monday-Friday) to confirm your appointment.

Thank you for choosing Sabates Eye Centers.

COMMON PEDIATRIC EYE CONDITIONS

Retinoblastoma 

Retinoblastoma, a malignant tumor that grows in the retina, the layer of light-sensing cells in the back of the eye, can destroy a child’s vision and be fatal. Affecting children of all races, boys and girls equally, retinoblastoma occurs in one or both eyes, usually in the first year or two of life. The most common sign is a change in the color of the pupil, which can appear white in reflected light. This phenomenon is referred to as a cat’s eye reflex or leukocoria. Sometimes the affected eye will cross or turn outward. Retinoblastoma can be hereditary and is more likely to develop in children with a family history of the disease.

 

With early diagnosis, retinoblastoma treatment is remarkably effective. More than 90 percent of children survive and many eyes are saved with a combination of medications, radiation therapy, and heat, freezing, or laser treatments. In severe cases, the affected eye is removed.

 

If a child has had retinoblastoma there is an increased chance for a second cancer to develop. Children with retinoblastoma should have regular examinations by an ophthalmologist and a pediatric oncologist.

Retinopathy of Prematurity

Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) damages premature babies’ retinas, the layer of light-sensitive cells lining the back of the eye. ROP usually occurs in both eyes, though one may be more severely affected. The last 12 weeks of a full-term pregnancy are an especially active time for the growth of the eye. When a baby is born prematurely, blood vessels are not ready to supply blood to the retina. At birth, abnormal new blood vessels form and cause scarring or detachment of the retina. The condition is especially common in very small babies. It is more likely to occur at one or two pounds than at three pounds.

 

Despite improved medical care, the disease is becoming more common because smaller and sicker infants are surviving. Supplemental oxygen given to premature babies may be part of the cause of ROP, but not the only factor, as once thought.

 

In severe cases, the retina may be extremely scarred and detached. Many cases get better without treatment and only a small number of children go blind. Freezing (cryotherapy) or laser treatments can prevent progression of the disease.

 

Children with ROP are more likely to develop nearsightedness and amblyopia (lazy eye). Glasses, patching, and eye muscle surgery can help these associated problems. Follow-up exams of severely affected children should continue periodically.