Retina Doctor

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When it’s Serious, See the Best

Retinal diseases are serious conditions. The retina is the thin inner lining at the back of the eye and contains millions of light-sensitive cells and nerve tissue that are largely responsible for your ability to see. Anything affecting this area can harm your central vision.

The Sabates Eye Centers Approach 

At Sabates Eye Centers, our Retina Specialty Group diagnoses and treats more than 20 different retinal diseases and conditions, many of which share common symptoms and often-complex treatments. The goal is always to stop or slow the disease and preserve, improve or restore your vision.

 

As America’s population ages, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are two retinal diseases that increasingly threaten the vision of millions of people.

 

To learn more about surgical options for treating these diseases, visit our Retina Surgery page.

  • Senior eye patient looking for retinal disease eye specialist.

    Did You Know?

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of poor vision in the United States, with approximately 170,000 new cases discovered each year.

  • Close up of eye of patient who has retinal eye disease.

    RETINAL DETACHMENT: OVERVIEW

  • Retinal doctor and eye disease specialist Dr. Michael A. Cassell - Sabates Eye Centers

    Retina Eye Doctor

    Dr. Michael A. Cassell, M.D. – Dr. Cassell sees patients at the Independence, Leawood, Olathe and St. Joseph Eye Centers, plus at Truman Medical Center - University Health and Lakewood.

     

For emergency or time sensitive appointments, call 913-261-2020
or 1-800-742-0020 (toll free).

Schedule Appointment

Are you a new or returning patient?

Returning Patient

Have you enrolled in Patient Portal and do you have a password?


Returning Patient

As of the beginning of 2015, we are asking all returning patients to enroll in Patient Portal. This online portal contains a wealth of general health information, along with patient-specific communications from our practice.

To sign up, please call our scheduling department at 913-261-2020. They will provide you with a PIN number to use when enrolling.

New Patient Information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment

A Medical Eye Exam -

  • Thorough dilated exam to address eye medical conditions.
  • Examples: cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration.
  • This type of exam is a detailed medical exam to determine, assess, and recommend any treatment necessary and may include additional testing.
  • Filed to your insurance under medical coverage.

A Routine Eye Exam -

  • This type of exam will assess the basic general health of your eyes and may include dilation.
  • Schedule a new glasses or contact lens prescription.
  • Filed as a routine eye exam with your insurance or vision service plan.
  • No medical eye conditions will be evaluated at this exam.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Are you a contact lens wearer?


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Physician



The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Insurance Information

Please contact your insurance to confirm network eligibility.

Are you the primary insurance holder

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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Preferred Time of Appointment

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Additional information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Confirm Your information

Type of Appointment

Medical Routine



Are you the primary insurance holder

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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Thank You

You're ready to see the best.

You've successfully requested an appointment with Sabates Eye Centers, the most trusted name in eye care.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We'll be in touch by phone by 5 p.m. the next business day (Monday-Friday) to confirm your appointment.

Thank you for choosing Sabates Eye Centers.

SABATES EYE CENTERS Retina Doctors

First things first – Here’s what to expect during your visit with one of our retina doctors. You will be taking one of the following three tests.

 

1. Retinal angiography is a common diagnostic test using dye and a special camera that captures the dye as it moves through the blood vessels. Our ophthalmologists perform this test to help diagnose diseases and monitor conditions within your retina or choroid. The most common dye used is called fluorescein. Another, less frequently used type of dye is called indocyanine green.

 

2. Fluorescein angiography is a clinical test to look at blood circulation inside the back of the eye. It aids in the diagnosis of retinal conditions associated with diabetes, age-related macular degeneration, as well as other eye abnormalities. The test can also help follow the course of a disease and monitor its treatment. It may be repeated on multiple occasions with no harm to the eye or body.

 

Fluorescein, a harmless orange-red dye, is injected into a vein in the arm. The dye travels through the body to the blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive nerve layer at the back of the eye. A special camera with a green filter flashes a blue light into the eye and takes multiple photographs of the retina. The technique uses regular photographic film. No X-rays are involved.

 

If there are abnormal blood vessels, the dye leaks into the retina or stains the blood vessels. Damage to the lining of the retina or atypical new blood vessels may be revealed as well. These abnormalities are determined through a careful interpretation of the photographs by an ophthalmologist. The dye can discolor skin and urine until it is removed from the body by the kidneys.

 

There is little risk in having fluorescein angiography, though some people may have a mild allergic reaction to the dye. Severe allergic reactions have been rarely reported. There is no increased risk in using fluorescein in patients who are allergic to contrast. Occasionally, some of the dye leaks out of the vein at the injection site, causing a slight burning sensation that usually goes away quickly.

 

3. Indocyanine Green Angiography (ICG) is a clinical test used to detect abnormal blood vessels in the choroid, the layer of blood vessels under the retina. These abnormal blood vessels, typically associated with macular degeneration, may cause bleeding, scarring and vision loss.

 

Indocyanine, a harmless green dye, gives off infrared light. When injected into the bloodstream, the dye travels through the veins to the blood vessels in the eye. A video camera connected to a computer picks up the infrared light and makes a picture of the blood’s circulation. No film or X-rays are involved.

 

Following the test, the liver removes the dye. There is little risk in having an ICG angiogram. Some people may have a mild allergic reaction. Patients with the following allergies should avoid ICG: iodine, contrast and shellfish.