Vision Over 60

Vision for life

70 may be the new 60. But your eyes may not agree. They continue to age, no matter how active your lifestyle at 60 and beyond. The good news: Frequent exams and expert eye care can help your eyes keep up with your lifestyle and maintain its quality. Sabates Eye Centers’ optometrists and ophthalmologists ensure your changing eyes get the attention they deserve, including finding and treating age-related eye diseases early. Our goal is yours: vision for life.

Eye Conditions and Signs to Look For

Cloudy vision: Trouble seeing the TV and seeing behind the wheel at night? Yes, headlights are brighter today, but blame the lenses in your eyes. Nearly everyone develops cataracts with age as once-clear lenses become cloudy.

 

Tunnel vision: Does it seem like your peripheral vision is gone? High pressure inside your eye is producing that tunnel vision. This could mean glaucoma has set in.

Blurry images, duller colors: When books, magazines and road signs are tougher to read, or your flower bed isn’t as bright as it used to be, these may be warning signs of macular degeneration.

Floating spots, flashing lights: The occasional black speck floating around in your view is normal. But if they become more frequent, and are accompanied by bright flashes, they could signal an early stage of retinal detachment.

  • Potential reduced risk of...

    developing age-related macular degeneration if you exercise regularly, according to American Academy of Ophthalmology studies.

  • Did you know?

    Cataracts usually...

    develop in both eyes, but one is often worse than the other.

  • Ask Dr. Walline

    Q:    

    I’ve controlled my diabetes for years. Am I still at high risk for eye problems?

    A:     

    It sounds like you’ve done well managing your diabetes, which does reduce your risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Unfortunately, more than 80 percent of Type 1 and 2 diabetics will develop it after 15-19 years living with diabetes. When detected early, retinopathy’s damage can successfully be slowed with surgery and/or medication.

For emergency or time sensitive appointments, call 913-261-2020
or 1-800-742-0020 (toll free).

Schedule Appointment

Are you a new or returning patient?

Returning Patient

Have you enrolled in Patient Portal and do you have a password?


Returning Patient

As of the beginning of 2015, we are asking all returning patients to enroll in Patient Portal. This online portal contains a wealth of general health information, along with patient-specific communications from our practice.

To sign up, please call our scheduling department at 913-261-2020. They will provide you with a PIN number to use when enrolling.

New Patient Information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment

A Medical Eye Exam -

  • Thorough dilated exam to address eye medical conditions.
  • Examples: cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration.
  • This type of exam is a detailed medical exam to determine, assess, and recommend any treatment necessary and may include additional testing.
  • Filed to your insurance under medical coverage.

A Routine Eye Exam -

  • This type of exam will assess the basic general health of your eyes and may include dilation.
  • Schedule a new glasses or contact lens prescription.
  • Filed as a routine eye exam with your insurance or vision service plan.
  • No medical eye conditions will be evaluated at this exam.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Type of Appointment


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Are you a contact lens wearer?


The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Physician



The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Insurance Information

Please contact your insurance to confirm network eligibility.

Are you the primary insurance holder

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The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Preferred Time of Appointment

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Additional information

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Confirm Your information

Type of Appointment

Medical Routine



Are you the primary insurance holder

Yes No

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will contact you by 5 p.m. the next business day to confirm appointment details.

Thank You

You're ready to see the best.

You've successfully requested an appointment with Sabates Eye Centers, the most trusted name in eye care.

The scheduling department is open Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. We'll be in touch by phone by 5 p.m. the next business day (Monday-Friday) to confirm your appointment.

Thank you for choosing Sabates Eye Centers.

Seeing Through the Big Five

Patients tell us losing eyesight is their single greatest fear. Helping them see their best is our greatest satisfaction. Serious conditions and eye disease don’t have to mean permanent vision loss. Here’s how Sabates Eye Centers doctors help patients with five common age-related conditions.

 

Cataracts: This common clouding of the eye’s lens is more treatable than ever. If vision is only slightly blurry, a change in prescription may do the trick. Cataract surgery is very common for worse cases. The eye’s old cloudy lens is removed and replaced with a clear implant. With the addition of our new LenSx laser-assisted cataract surgery equipment, these surgeries are quicker and less invasive.

 

AMD: Age-related macular degeneration is a breakdown of the eye’s light-sensitive lining of the retina. While no proven treatments are available for either the “wet” (advanced) or “dry” form of AMD, raising vitamin C, E, beta-carotene and zinc in the diet can reduce the risk of further vision loss.

 

Glaucoma: Normal eyes have clear fluid continually flowing in and out, maintaining healthy pressure. Glaucoma disrupts the flow, and pressure builds and vision suffers. A variety of medications and surgical procedures exist. Seeing a glaucoma specialist early will help determine the best option and limit permanent eye damage. 

 

Detached retina: When the vitreous – the gel-filled middle of our eye – shrinks as we age, it can pull on the retina and often detaches altogether, causing blindness if gone untreated. A variety of low-pain or painless surgical procedures are used to repair the retina tear.

 

Diabetic retinopathy: Blood vessels in the retina begin to swell and leak fluid or close completely (or new ones form on the retina’s surface). Treatments such as laser surgery can slow loss of vision, but cannot restore it.